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Dorado Invade Southern California Waters

Southern California anglers catch "mahi madness" as dorado find warm water as far north as the Channel Islands.

August 24, 2012
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The gleaming golden flanks leave no doubt as to why Mexican anglers named this species dorado — Spanish for gold. Jim Hendricks
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Dorado congregate under floating kelp paddies which also hold bait such as Pacific mackerel jacks — a favorite prey for mahi right now. Jim Hendricks
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Fly-lining live mackerel or sardines is the most popular method of catching dorado under floating kelp paddies. Jim Hendricks
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The name “dorado” is Spanish for gold, but the fish goes by a number of names among Southern California anglers, including mahi, blunt-head and dodo. Jim Hendricks
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Dorado are not the only exotic species to invade the Southern California coast. Finback whale are also finding the rich, warm waters appealing. Jim Hendricks
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The dorado off the Southern California coast this summer have been averaging between 10 and 15 pounds. Jim Hendricks
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Anglers have found that they need fairly light tackle to entice dorado to bite — no more than 25-pound test. Jim Hendricks
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Mark Wisch revels in a recent light-tackle dorado catch off the Southern California coast. Jim Hendricks
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When dorado are found under a kelp paddy close to shore, it’s not unusual to find several boats fishing and catching mahi. Jim Hendricks
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Josh Hendricks battles a strong dorado on light tackle in the late afternoon. Some of the best mahi fishing takes place late in the day, often just before sunset. Jim Hendricks
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In epic El Nino fashion, dorado are thick in the warm ocean waters off the Southern California coast right now. Next, read the related blog » Jim Hendricks
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