Luminescent Tackle

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In low light or murky waters, glow tackle such as beads, octopus hooks and jig heads really stand out.Jon Whittle
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Make soft baits such as Berkley Gulp's glowing swimming mullet the main attraction at night.Jon Whittle
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Anglers charge up their yo-yo jigs under a light before casting.Sam Hudson
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The result is an eerie glow like this vertical jig from Almost Alive Lures.Jon Whittle
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Hi-Seas' luminous glow beads act as a visual stimulant for fish when light is absent.Jon Whittle
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Even baits for species such as cobia or striped bass lend themselves to luminescence. This soft-plastic eel is rigged to a glow jighead by Almost Alive Lures.Jon Whittle
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Day-Glow Braid

SpiderWire recently introduced a braided fishing line that glows in sunlight. The glow of the Stealth Glow-Vis Braid has ­nothing to do with fish appeal but instead allows fishermen to track their lines, watching for line movement or subtle bites. “It has no fish-attracting attributes. It is designed purely for anglers to see the line above water,” says Ron Giudice, a SpiderWire spokesman. “During the daytime, use the line when fishing tannic or stained waters. The glow of the line contrasts with the water color.” SpiderWire claims Glow-Vis exhibits low visibility under the water and high visibility above — a special coating with “fluorescent brighteners” illuminates in air. “The line uses a unique ultraviolet reflective coating,” says Giudice. “We keep the formula close to the vest.” Since salt water can break apart UV rays, that glow dims to low-viz green once the line goes subsurface. The line is less visible to fish underwater when compared with normal braids, which is especially helpful when fish become line shy, the company says. The ­polyethylene microfiber line is available from 10- to 80-pound-test and is new for 2014.