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Ultralight Tackle Flats Fishing

December 16, 2013
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Below the calm surface hide bruiser redfish and enough snags to worry light-tackle anglers. (Photo by Graham Morton) Graham Morton
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This bonefish heads straight for seagrass once hooked. (Photo by Jason Arnold) Jason Arnold
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Take advantage of the height afforded by bow platforms to keep your line above submerged weeds and grasses. (Photo by Graham Morton) Graham Morton
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Redfish of this size require spools capable of handling plenty of light mono. (Photo by Graham Morton) Graham Morton
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A more manageable drum from the flats with a light spin setup. Because ultralight lines break so easily, choose a rod with an action and material that provide a lot of give. (Photo by Graham Morton)
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The author’s light-tackle leader. (Illustration by Dave Underwood) Dave Underwood
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(Photo by Graham Morton)
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Even small seatrout present a challenge on 2-pound-test monofilament. (Photo by Graham Morton) Graham Morton
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“High-stick” position is the preferred method to keep light line away from structure. (Photo by Graham Morton) Graham Morton
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