Advertisement

Fishing Lines

September 22, 2011
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
fishing-line-main.jpg
From monofilaments to fluorocarbons to braids, dozens of choices require savvy anglers to do their homework. Zach Stovall
fishing-line-thumb.jpg
Whether using mono or braid, make sure your spool is filled to maximum capacity. Henry Gilbey
fishing-line-flouro-machine.jpg
Fluorocarbon production stemmed from Japan and involves high-tech equipment, such as this Seaguar extruder. Courtesy Seaguar
fishing-line-braid-factory.jpg
With thousands of braiding machines, Western Filament has been producing braided fishing lines for years. Courtesy Western Filament
fishing-line-braid-factory2.jpg
With thousands of braiding machines, Western Filament has been producing braided fishing lines for years. Courtesy Western Filament
fishing-line-nanofil.jpg
Is it a braid? Is it a monofilament? With its new Nanofil line, it would seem that Berkley has created the first gel-spun “unifilament” line, as they’re calling it. Nanofil chemically fuses the gel-spun polyethylene fibers that make up braided lines into a pseudo single filament. (Note that other superbraids aren’t fused in this way; they fuse braided carriers. Nanofil fuses unbraided microscopic filaments.)
Advertisement

More Photos

Advertisement