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Dorado Biology

March 12, 2014
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Chromatophores in the skin of dolphin expand and contract to reflect the distinct blues, greens and yellows fishermen recognize. This brazen bull is likely less than a year old. Jason Arnold (jasonarnoldphoto.com)
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Find an unmolested piece of floating debris in 78- to 84-degree water, and chances are there are dolphin nearby. The abundant life around the flotsam is an appetizing attraction. Deron Verbeck
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Anglers bring aboard a gaffer-size dorado. Chris Woodward
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The largest dolphin are always bulls, identifiable by their square, block heads. Jon Schwartz
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Male bull dolphin grow faster and eat more than females, called cows, pictured above. Jon Schwartz
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Dolphin display silver-blue (pictured) or yellowish-green colors based on their moods. According to one observational study, the yellow represents distress and the blue color relaxation, making this teal-colored jumper unique. Bryan Toney
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This squid and dolphin were pulled from the stomach of a full-size mahi. Odd items pulled from fish include bottle caps, juvenile sailfish and sea turtles. Mike Mazur
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This weeks-old juvenile dolphin measures just 4 inches. Doug Perrine / Seapics.com
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To distinguish the occasional pompano dolphin (A) from a common dolphin (B), look for a square tooth patch over the pompano’s tongue. Don Hammond
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