High-Flying Makos

Photos by Paul Sharman

High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

Paul Sharman is a freelance outdoor and travel photographer and writer (www.paulsharmanoutdoors.com). He is currently based out of his native England where he is also editor of the FISH&FLY; group of websites. PHOTO: Rigging up! You need your gear to be in perfect shape as it will be tested to the limit - use quality products and you will get more fish to the boat.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

Click, click, click.... John Bretza of Okuma gets a pickup and lets the shark take some line while it gets the bait firmly in its mouth.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

Double-hook rigs are common on trolled baits with the rear stinger hook often being the one to strike home.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

As with most pelagic sharks, the mako has a fearsome gape designed to allow them to tear off large chunks of flesh from their prey.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

Don't try this at home. Handling sharks of any size, even a young mako pup like this is not typically recommended unless you are very experienced.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

The original orange "Mako Bomb" as used by mako on the fly pioneer and guide Captain Conway Bowman.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

This mako has a firm hold on the fly and is fighting right on top with the classic dorsal fin breaking the surface.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

Spot the difference! The much more muscular mako in the background is very different to the more slender blue shark in the foreground.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

The vivid orange of the mako bomb fly makes it easy to spot when sight casting to sharks that have followed the chum trail to the boat. It also helps to see them when they are hooked!
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

A typical mako fight will normally include at least one or two fast runs that include some acrobatic leaps.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

Seeing a 300-pound shark leap nine feet out of the water while attached to your line is spectacular and leaves quite an impression!
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

Sharks are both catchable and beatable on the correct fly gear and using good technique. Captain Conway Bowman demonstrates keeping the rod low and using its power to subdue the mako he has hooked.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

One of the most exciting sights you can have as a fly fisher is seeing that big round black eye staring back at you.
High-Flying Makos

High-Flying Makos

There are several ways to get out on the water after mako sharks in San Diego from chartered sport fishers like the Nomad pictured here to specialists like Bowman Bluewater Guides.