October Sport Fishing Girls

Women who love fishing, tackle and boats.

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October Sport Fishing Girls

We know you're out there, and we want to put you in our informative girls-only galleries. You could be the winner, picked at random, of an assortment of great Yo-Zuri lures valued at $100. In this gallery, we hope you'll discover something that you may not have known about a fish, a boat or a fishing destination. Send us your fishing photos to sfgirls@sportfishingmag.com. Michelle from Deerfield Beach, Florida, caught her first redfish off Marco Island. Redfish have been given game-fish status in Alabama, Florida, Louisian, South Carolina and Texas; in all federal waters, no red drum may be kept by anyone.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Gaylynn with a 140-pound **halibut **out of Seward, Alaska. Virtually all halibut are right-eyed, meaning both eyes are found on the upper, dark side of the body. Left-eyed halibut are rare; one report suggested a ratio of about 1 in 20,000. Check out more Sport Fishing Girls galleries here.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Ashley caught this bull redfish off South Padre Island when she was land-based shark fishing and caught this big boy. It ate an 11 inch whiting. The most distinguishing mark on the red drum is one large black spot on the upper part of the tail base. Having multiple spots is not uncommon for this fish but having no spots is extremely rare. As the fish with multiple spots grow older they seem to lose their excess spots. Scientists believe that the black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of their head, allowing the red drum to escape.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Devon caught a yellow eye snapper in the West End, Bahamas. She was on board the Tuff Catch with Captain Joe Wilhelm. The West End is known for its world-class fishing. The north side of the island is part of the Bahama Banks and has very shallow water, making it a popular destination for bonefish. Legendary bonefish guide Israel Rolle, known as "Bonefish Folley", died in July 2012. The West End local was known for guiding bonefishing clients like Ernest Hemingway, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Richard Nixon.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Jessica went fishing for **yellowtail **and mangrove snapper in Marathon of the Florida Keys. The yellowtail snapper is found in the western Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to Bermuda and southward to southeastern Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. It is most common in the Bahamas, off south Florida and in the Caribbean Sea.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Mariah caught this dorado off Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. She tells us that this is just one of the dozen that she brought in that day. Mahi eat insatiably and grow at an astounding rate, up to 18 inches in a year. The all-tackle-record 87-pounder was taken off Papagallo, Costa Rica, in 1976.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Dianne caught and released this** **snook off Siesta Key, Florida. She pulled it in with a a spook topwater plug. They explode readily on plugs and flies, and usually put on an exciting aerial display. The underslung jaw and dark lateral-line stripe make snook hard to mistake for anything else.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Cristy caught this kingfish or kingy as they call it in Australia. We might know them as southern yellowtail. She spotted the fish while doing a great white shark dive at the Neptune Island, South Australia. There's not a lot of difference between southern yellowtail and (the next fish in this list) California yellowtail — which are, in fact, the same species but believed to be different subspecies — except size, slightly.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Kelly grabbed this barramundi off Darwin, Australia on Adrenalin Barra & Billfish Safaris. Fishing a coastal creek only 10 meters wide using big soft plastics and casting to the edge of the bank, this incredible fish latched on just as she was pulling the lure out of the water to have another cast. She guessed it to be a 60-pounder. Barramundi share all the hard-fighting, high-jumping characteristics of snook, and they get considerably larger. They're also estuary-based ambush predators, hiding around mangroves or rocks in channels to dart out and snatch a live bait or lure.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Amy pulled in this false albacore off South Beach, Martha's Vineyard. These are also known as little tunnies. The little tunny feeds primarily on pelagic fish. It is best identified by the dark spots appearing between its pectoral and ventral fins and "worm-like" markings on its back. Amy's photo won a prize package of Yo-Zuri lures from Sport Fishing magazine. Be sure to send in your own photos to be part of the Sport Fishing Girls photo gallery and for your chance to win prizes.
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Sarah, who is based out of Puerto Quepos, Costa Rica, caught this hefty **pacific red snapper **- these are also known as rockfish. Rockfish are an important sport and commercial fish, and many species have been overfished. As a result seasons are tightly controlled in many areas. Sebastes are sometimes fraudulently substituted for the more expensive red snapper (L. campechanus).
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Rosemary nabbed this spinner shark in the Florida Keys. The tooth shape and coloration of this species varies significantly with age and between geographical regions, which caused much taxonomic confusion.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Keli brought in this 44 inch** redfish** near Sanibel in Ft. Myers, Florida. She caught this beauty on a pinfish. Other common names for the pinfish include pin perch, sand perch, and butterfish.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Nicole fished with St. Andrews Sport Fishing Co. in St. Andrews, NB, Canada - Bay of Fundy. She caught this cod just off East Quoddy Lighthouse near Campobello Island. In one hour, cod have been recorded to cover a mean range of 99 to 226 square meters. Swimming speed was higher during the day than at night. This is reflected in the fact that cod more actively search for food during the day.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Christina with a wahoo. These fish typically patrol near the surface, from blue water far offshore to the edges of steep rocky shorelines and submarine shelves. See our past Sport Fishing Girls galleries: September Sport Fishing Girls Gallery August Sport Fishing Girls Gallery
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Shirley brought in this permit**** off Islamorada, fishing with her husband, Captain Ted Wilson. Permit are widely considered the most elusive and wary trophy among flats fishermen, permit range throughout tropical waters of the western Atlantic.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Jillian landed a pair of fluke, 24 and 18 inches, off Ocean City Reef in New Jersey. They are also known as summer flounder. This is a left-eyed flatfish. The eyed side always blends in perfectly with the sea bed. There is usually a scattering of 10 to 14 eye- like spots on the body. As in other flatfish, the blind side is white and relatively featureless. The teeth are well developed on both sides of the jaws.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Sheree with her trevally caught off Coral Bay, Washington. Trevally are typical of the jack family, in that they aggressively strike lures, jigs, flies and bait, and offer a balls-out, tough fight to the end.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

Paulette Barrett off St Petersburg, Florida with a blackfin tuna during the Old Salt's Fall King of the Beach tournament. Blackfin tuna are widespread throughout the temperate and tropical Western Atlantic, this very accessible and aggressive surface-schooling tuna is a favorite of anglers. Check out more Sport Fishing Girls galleries here.
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October Sport Fishing Girls

We know you're out there, and we want to put you in our informative girls-only galleries. You could be the winner, picked at random, of an assortment of great Yo-Zuri lures valued at $100. In this gallery, we hope you'll discover something that you may not have known about a fish, a boat or a fishing destination. Send us your fishing photos to sfgirls@sportfishingmag.com. Cyndi with a 40-inch snook caught off Ft. Myers Beach, Florida at the May Reef. The all-tackle record common snook stands at 53 pounds, 10 ounces, landed at Costa Rica's Rio Parsimina in 1978 by Gilbert Ponzi. Even larger is the record 57-pound, 12-ounce Pacific black snook landed in 1991. Nice hat, Cyndi!