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Choosing a Fishing Kayak

Kayaks have evolved into hard-core fishing machines

February 1, 2012
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Hobie’s Mirage Pro Angler facilitates hands-free propulsion, making it easy to fight scrappy fish. Courtesy Hobie Cat Co.
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Freedom Hawk’s Pathfinder
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Native Watercraft’s Mariner Angler
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Ocean Kayak’s Trident Ultra Angler 4.7
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Elie’s Gulf 120XE Angler
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Wilderness Systems’ Ride 115 Angler
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So you’ve towed your kayak to a fishy place, only to realize you’ve got a couple hundred yards to carry it from car to water’s edge. Even with a light ’yak, this can be a chore (and sometimes a dangerous one). Wheeled carts can help. Hobie makes three excellent “plug-in” carts for its ’yaks (MSRPs $96 to $190), while retailer L.L. Bean offers the All-Terrain Boat Cart (pictured), which features large, sturdy wheels capable of transporting a boat over the roughest ground, and costs $130.
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