Fillet Like a Pro

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Capt. Vincent Daniello
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1

Capt. Lige Lawrence (Island Hooker, Fort Lauderdale) makes it a point to get the meat in a mahi’s head, bull or cow.Capt. Vincent Daniello
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2

He then skins mahi fillets one-third or one-half at a time.Capt. Vincent Daniello
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3

He cuts about one-eighth inch above the skin.Capt. Vincent Daniello
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4

Lawrence “feels” with the blade — smooth through the flesh but rougher when near the skin.Capt. Vincent Daniello
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5

As he separates fillet from skin, he continues to hold the knife blade angled just past parallel with the surface of the cleaning table.Capt. Vincent Daniello
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6

Having started in the middle of the fillet rather than at an end, the knife provides a wider area of support to help keep the blade above rather slicing than through the thin skin.Capt. Vincent Daniello
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7

Although mahi rib bones are less robust than in grouper or snapper, the rib cage still needs to be trimmed out.Capt. Vincent Daniello
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8

Before the job is done, with mahi as most fish, remove the blood line that runs alongside the spine.Capt. Vincent Daniello