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October 26, 2001

Pop Goes the Lure

If you plan to trash those wahoo-chewed skirts or any trimmings left over after cutting skirts to match your hook-sets - don't!

If you plan to trash those wahoo-chewed skirts or any trimmings left over after cutting skirts to match your hook-sets  don't! Here's a riveting idea that will put them to good use.
From your hardware store, pick up a box of pop rivets, a roll of double-stick cellophane tape, some tying thread and a roll of black electrical tape. Rivets come in a wide range of sizes, but we use 1/8-inch-diameter aluminum rivets to make lures suitable for bait-size skipjacks and other small tunas.
Remove the center pin from the rivet with pliers; the remaining sleeve becomes your lure head. Wrap the tubular part of the rivet with a short piece of double-stick tape. Select six to 10 strands of lure trimmings and adhere them to the tape, working around the shaft. The adhesive won't hold the trimmings permanently but will keep them in position until you secure them with a dozen wraps of waxed thread.
Once the skirt is held in place with thread, finish off with a few wraps of electrical tape. For less than a dime, you have a lure that I've used to catch skipjacks, frigate mackerel, yellowfin tuna, mahimahi and small jacks. The blunt face digs in to keep the lure tracking nicely at speeds up to 12 knots. The aluminum rivet, though not entirely corrosion proof, stands up well to salt water. And your lure trimmings never end up in the waste basket.
Jim Rizzuto
Kamuela, Hawaii