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February 16, 2010

Ancient image translates to modern logo of angling responsibility

The striking images encourage anglers to be pro-active rather than reactive...

Assigning a logo to a concept isn't a new marketing practice, of course, but Aaron Adams hopes the new Tribal Bonefish moniker spurs anglers not only to accept the idea but also to change their thinking. Adams, an avid angler and the executive director for Bonefish and Tarpon Trust, says anglers must be proactive for conservation.
 
On the Tribal Bonefish website - www.tribalbonefish.com - Adams explains: " It's about being a responsible participant, not a bystander or someone who damages the resource."
  
The website goes on to define "fishing responsibly" and asks anglers to not only worry about their rights but to be responsible for the resource, for the long term. Adams offers a list of action items and coaches anglers on fishing, boating and flats etiquette.
 
Also on the website, anglers can order T-shirts and hats with the Tribal Bonefish logo, a petroglyphic stick figure casting a rod. Half the profits go to support fisheries conservation groups such as BTT.
 
For more information, visit tribalbonefish.com or read the following press release from Adams:

Tribal Bonefish; A Logo Whose Time Has Come
If a picture is worth 1,000 words, how many words can be inspired by pictures that are thousands of years old? Especially when the pictures are petroglyphs, rock carvings created in Hawaii thousands of years ago to evoke the artists' involvement with and respect for their natural surroundings.
    
Words like conservation, stewardship, and fisheries come to mind, as do habitat, natural resources and long-term perspective. But it is responsibility that most comes to mind for fisheries ecologist and avid angler Aaron J. Adams, who has transformed those petroglyph images into a message-inspiring logo known as Tribal Bonefish. He hopes that this symbolic logo rewards responsible behavior already practiced by many anglers, and encourages similar behavior by others.
   
The striking images encourage anglers to be pro-active rather than reactive in conservation concerns and serve as reminders to work toward healthy fisheries in the future. Beyond fishing, Tribal Bonefish images are graphic prompts to all who are actively involved in the outdoors to act responsibly.
    
Not a symbol of a group or club, the Tribal Bonefish logo reinforces the message to all who wear and see it: we are as responsible for the outdoors as were our ancestors who first carved those messages.
    
Tribal Bonefish also draws some inspiration from bonefish, a speedster that has lived in coastal shallows around the globe for millions of years. The bonefish symbolizes all species of game fish and reminds anglers of the boundless potential for our fisheries if we act on that awareness. Invoking the past, through the petroglyphs, helps us conserve fish for the future.
    
In time, not only anglers but other outdoor enthusiasts may become part of this "tribal" perspective, this timely movement. The logo reminds people to support existing conservation groups, to get involved, to make a difference. To see the logo on anyone, anywhere, is to see someone who is an active participant in the outdoors with a commitment to conservation for the future.
    
Tribal Bonefish makes it easy for people to show their true colors and to carry on the ancient reverence for our natural world. The eye-catching logo is available on hats and tee shirts, with half the profits going to environmental groups such as Bonefish and Tarpon Trust (www.tarbone.org).

The website for Tribal Bonefish (www.tribalbonefish.com) further expounds on thephilosophy, displays gear bearing the logo and provides links to sites where good things are already happening. Anyone interested in the notion of responsible boating and fishing, who realizes that nature is not a theme park, and who wants to know more about practical conservation, can go on line to learn more about the biggest picture of all.